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Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #10 on: 13 June, 2008, 11:31:17 PM »
Hi pharis,
this is just what I have been hoping for. That other members take pictures and help building our on-line service manual. Your bike seems to be blue as mine, so there should be 100% compatibility  :046:
If you get stuck with uploading pictures or writing text, do not hesitate to ask for help.
By the way- I have just finished anoter DIY article titled "Oil Service - Engine Oil & Filter Change" and sent a mail to Big Bear so he can add it to the Articles section.
You may have an early look (for inspiration?) at it on my own site.
Reards ... Freddy

Offline andyinvienna

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #11 on: 14 June, 2008, 07:24:23 AM »
*Originally Posted by nbells [+]
Remeber thats a dry torque figure ...!!!

Could you explain the term dry torque figure?
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Offline fatharry

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #12 on: 14 June, 2008, 09:36:20 AM »
*Originally Posted by Freddy Jacobsen [+]
:001:  :001:  :001: Thanks for the translation fatharry. It pointed me in the right direction to find it in the service manual and - as an extra benefit - gave me a good laugh. Looks like you had some help from babelfish - right ? - if not you can always count on me if you need a little help with the finer details of the Danish language  :015:

The service manual by the way confirms the info given by andyinvienna  :037:


Google translator, but worth a shot. I can write in Norwegian if you prefer, now i know you can read that easily..........but i have a hard time finding the right letters with an English keyboard :001:, and it takes me an age!!, still pretty fluent in the spoken word though
It's not a case of whether we can fix it or not - it's more a case of how fixed would you like it?

Offline pharis

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #13 on: 14 June, 2008, 10:57:54 PM »
This is how I changed the chain.  Some of the photos were a bit of an afterthought, so show removing bits when the new bits have been fitted.  Some good info on changing a chain can be found here and here.   It contains better info on riveting the chain that I have largely skiped over.  But below contains some specific info for the biffer.  Hope it helps someone else.

With the bike on the side stand, and allowed to cool down, have a friend standing on the rear brake, and using a 19mm socket, crack the nuts holding the rear sprocket.


Release the 10mm bolt from the gear selector. 

Mark the clamp and selector, so that the clamp is positioned back onto the same splines on reassembly.  Prise the clamp apart and remove by pulling forward.  With a 6mm allen key remove the linkage from chassis. 

Donít loose the washer on the back.  The linkage is full of grease, so either try to avoid getting cleaning stuff inside, or re-grease it before reassembly.

Remove the 3 8mm headed bolts from the clutch actuator (marked 1) and remove.

Remove the clutch actuator rod from the engine and keep somewhere safe. 
Remove the remaining 8mm (marked A) headed bolts from the sprocket cover.  The inside will be full of chain lube and road crap, and will spill out.  Make sure there is something under the bike to catch this.

Slowly ease the cover away from the bike, with the metal gasket.  Clean the worst of the crud out.

With a friend standing on the back brake, undo the bolt holding the front sprocket on with a 14mm socket. 


Put the bike on the main stand, and remove the rear wheel.  22mm socket on the drive side, 27mm on brake side.  Release the wheel alignment nuts. Keeping the spindle nut just on the end of the thread, give the spindle a knock to pop it out the far side and to get a grip of it.  Remove the nut, washers and guides to somewhere safe.
Wiggle the brake assembly out, and up and away from the disc.  Watch for the spacers falling out.  Big one with the flange on the drive side, and the little one, somewhere else.

Find a link to brake the chain at. Either file the head of the rivet off and use a chain splitter tool to remove the rivet, or use a grinder, and just cut the old chain off.

Noting which way the front sprocket is positioned, remove and check you have the right one.  You are stuffed now anyway as the chain is cut.  Clean the rest of the crud out of the front sprocket area, and anywhere else you canít normally get at.  (Back brake, swing arm area, etc.)

Remove the old rear sprocket from the wheel.  (if you didnít crack the nuts earlier while the wheel was still on the bike, sit on the wheel, leaning against a wall and undo them, (the wheel nuts)).

Fit the new rear sprocket.  Sitting on the tyre, with a 19mm socket, torque the nuts up to 108Nm.  Tighten up opposing nuts rather than adjacent ones.

Fit the front sprocket, but donít tighten the bolt yet.  Feed the chain in around front sprocket.  Fit the connecting link, but donít rivet it yet.

Refit the rear wheel, mindful of the wheel spacers.

With the rivet link held on the rear sprocket, rivet the chain together.


If something cracks, it is likely the riveting tool.....  :164:


With the bike in gear, or a friend standing lightly on the rear brake, tighten the front sprocket nut to 54Nm.


Re-fit the steel gasket and sprocket cover.  Ensure the 8mm bolts are tight, as when the clutch actuator is fitted, one of the bolts will be awkward to get at.
Reinsert the clutch actuator rod.

Refit the clutch thing. 

Refit the gear selector linkage, lining up with the marks made at disassembly.

Tension the chain and align the rear wheel

Take the bike for a wee spin around the block to ensure all is running correctly.  Check the chain tension, as it will stretch slightly from new.
« Last Edit: 16 June, 2008, 03:23:18 PM by pharis »
Ali

Offline FireBladerDk

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #14 on: 14 June, 2008, 11:30:18 PM »
 :046:  :152:  :047:
Hi pharis,
great to see such a good DIY article with excellent pictures and good descriptive text. And on a task that I have not yet done myself. It will help me and many other members getting the DIY work done.

I would suggest that you ask Big Bear to include your DIY article in the Articles section with a proper heading. Something like "Chain - Exchanging".

Again - great work and  :460:

Freddy

Offline nbells

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #15 on: 14 June, 2008, 11:57:52 PM »
Andy .

Dry Torque figure means that the nut is put on and tightened with no lubricant on the threads.

all types of grease / copperslip have a coefficiant factor which aid torquing up.. so if you put on copperslip onto a nut and then torque it up to say 50lbs.. it would actually be torqued up to 65lbs ... so you can see it would be very easy to strip a thread..

Also you are very prone to streaching the thread and buggering it up alltogether ....

So if something was supposed to be torqued up to 50lbs dry .. you would use the coefficiant for the type of grease you have applied and then do a little calc and it might turn out that you only need to torque it up to 35lbs to achieve the same as 50lbs dry ....

I hope this makes sense as I am sitting here almost finished my second bottle of wine ....

As a foot note ..Molycote has a factor of 0.3...

I will explain it better when sober .... sh*t Im seeing double now ... hic !!!!!

Offline Hagar

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #16 on: 15 June, 2008, 12:14:57 AM »
Ha Pharis

You can do my chain anytime, bet your cheaper than Ecosse  :001: :001:

Offline pharis

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #17 on: 15 June, 2008, 09:58:24 AM »
I'm in no hurry to do another one.  Dirty manky horrible job. 
But atleast you won't need a chain for another few thousand miles.

When you do, if you need a hand, give me a shout.  :028:
Ali

Offline andyinvienna

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #18 on: 15 June, 2008, 12:13:13 PM »
*Originally Posted by nbells [+]
Andy .

Dry Torque figure means that the nut is put on and tightened with no lubricant on the threads.

all types of grease / copperslip have a coefficiant factor which aid torquing up.. so if you put on copperslip onto a nut and then torque it up to say 50lbs.. it would actually be torqued up to 65lbs ... so you can see it would be very easy to strip a thread..

Also you are very prone to streaching the thread and buggering it up alltogether ....

So if something was supposed to be torqued up to 50lbs dry .. you would use the coefficiant for the type of grease you have applied and then do a little calc and it might turn out that you only need to torque it up to 35lbs to achieve the same as 50lbs dry ....

I hope this makes sense as I am sitting here almost finished my second bottle of wine ....

As a foot note ..Molycote has a factor of 0.3...

I will explain it better when sober .... sh*t Im seeing double now ... hic !!!!!

Well I too had a bottle or three op Vino last night, so I understand your delemere, thanks for the interesting article, you just taught an old dog a new trick Cheers.
Good judgement comes from bad experience ..... Most of that comes from bad judgement.

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Offline mattpringle

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Re: Front Sprocket
« Reply #19 on: 20 June, 2008, 06:22:16 PM »
Fantastic well written article Pharis....we need more how to's like that on the forum. :495:

Am I correct in assuming that the slave clutch cylinder can be removed without lose of fluid....reason for asking is I have been meaning to clean out the front sprocket housing for ages but was afraid of fecking the clutch up.

Once again well done! :031:
« Last Edit: 20 June, 2008, 11:26:12 PM by mattpringle »